Nizagara 100mg


Q & A’s



Print Friendly

Click on “Play All” to view all 11 Teen Q and A Videos, or click the “Playlist” dropdown at the top left corner of the video player to view them individually.

You can also CLICK HERE to view them on YouTube.

Additional Q and A’s:

QUESTION:
I’m not sick. Why do I need to go to the doctor?

ANSWER:
Although you may feel fine, it is important to always go to your doctor appointments. Primary immunodeficiency diseases need to be monitored through medical tests and checkups with your healthcare team. These tests and checkups are very important in helping you continue to feel well and do the things you enjoy. At your next medical appointment, ask your doctor this question for a personalized answer.


QUESTION:
I feel fine. Why do I need to take this medicine?

ANSWER:
When we are feeling well, it is easy to forget the times when we were ill. If you are taking medication and feeling better, the medication is probably working. You need the medicine prescribed by your healthcare provider to keep you feeling well. Ask your healthcare provider to explain why you need medication and the effects of not taking it.


QUESTION:
How do I explain my primary immunodeficiency to my friends?

ANSWER:
A simple explanation is probably the best. You can say something like: “I have a primary immunodeficiency disease, which means I was born with of my immune system missing. The treatment for is , which helps me live a normal life. Primary immunodeficiencies are genetic conditions and not contagious.”


QUESTION:
Will I always have a primary immunodeficiency?

ANSWER:
Researchers are working hard to find a cure for primary immunodeficiency. It is important to remember, however, that thousands of patients lead normal lives with PI. With proper treatment and lifestyle choices, you can be one of the thousands who live happy, successful lives.


QUESTION:
How can I keep up at school when I’m absent so much?

ANSWER:
Increased absence from school can make it extremely difficult to keep up on assignments. The first step is making sure that your teachers and other school personnel are aware of your illness. Effective communication between your home and school is essential. A simple process such as an email to your teachers requesting assignments on the day of an absence, which could be sent home with a brother, sister, or neighbor, will keep you from falling behind. Another suggestion would be for your teacher to drop off the assignments in the main office and your parents could pick them up. You will probably want to ask your school for an extra set of textbooks that you can keep at home. That way your teacher doesn’t have to find the books in your locker or desk, and it simplifies the process. It is more convenient for you and them.

Part of the responsibility is on you, but you need to remember that your school is also responsible for helping you get an education. Even though you have a primary immunodeficiency, you still have the right to an education. Laws require school personnel to set up a program that will help you keep up at school. Click here for more information about these programs that you can review with your parents.


QUESTION:
I want to join this team and be with my friends. What should I tell the coach about my illness?

ANSWER:
Schools may not exclude students from sports teams if they can keep up with their classmates. If you have the interest and skills to participate in a sport and you make the team, good for you! You should decide if your PI is going to prevent you from attending all practices and games. If it is, then you need to tell your coach about your illness so they know you have a valid reason for being absent from a practice or game. Most coaches have attendance requirements so it will be important to communicate with them when you are going to be gone due to illness or medical appointments.


QUESTION:
Am I the only person with a primary immunodeficiency? How can I meet other teens with PI?

ANSWER:
Although, primary immunodeficiency diseases are rare, there are thousands of people with PI. IDF has Teen Escape Weekends where you can meet other teens with primary immunodeficiencies. In addition, a member of the IDF Teen Volunteer Network would be willing to contact you or your parent via e-mail or telephone. Be sure to join our social network IDF Common Ground, designed exclusively for teens with PI to network. Common Ground is a place where you can share with others who understand PI and get involved on the discussion forum. You can talk about your PI, school, or just everyday life. Common Ground also provides users with the opportunity to create a profile and upload photos and videos!


QUESTION:
Will I be able to go to college and live away from home?

ANSWER:
Your primary immunodeficiency should not prevent you from attending college and living away from home. As a matter of fact, countless people with PI attend college and live away from home. The more important question is which school is best for you? Once you start the process of visiting and selecting a school, you will want to talk to your current healthcare provider to assure that treatment for your PI is readily available and, hopefully, convenient. Your healthcare team will probably know a provider in the area and be able to work with you to transfer your care. Additional information is available at the Young Adult section of this site for useful information when you are start considering which college or vocational school you will attend.


QUESTION:
Will I be able to have a career?

ANSWER:
Your primary immunodeficiency should not prevent you from having a successful career. Thousands of patients with PI have accomplished amazing things despite their illness. Your career choice may be influenced by your PI, but it should not be the only consideration. Think about the following questions to help you decide on a career.

  • What are my interests?
  • What skills do I have?
  • What do I value?
  • What motivates me?
  • Will my job choice be affected by my PI?

In addition to thinking about the types of careers that interest you, talk to a school counselor to schedule a job shadow or interview with someone working in your area of interest. IDF has a strong volunteer network of adults that work in many careers. Contact IDF if you would like to communicate with a volunteer employed in an area that interests you.

Visit the Young Adult section for additional information to consider when making career choices.