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Since You Asked: Question & Answer (January 2019)

January 31, 2019

This article originally appeared in the IDF monthly e-newsletter, Primary Immune Tribune. Click here to subscribe.

Question 1: I was recently diagnosed with Common Variable Immune Deficiency (CVID) and started weekly subcutaneous immunoglobulin (Ig) treatments 6 weeks ago. I’m concerned because I’m still getting infections and feel very fatigued. What can I expect from Ig treatment and when will I notice improvement?
Question 2: I have IgA deficiency. Can I be an organ donor?


Question: I was recently diagnosed with Common Variable Immune Deficiency (CVID) and started weekly subcutaneous immunoglobulin (Ig) treatments 6 weeks ago. I’m concerned because I’m still getting infections and feel very fatigued. What can I expect from Ig treatment and when will I notice improvement?

Answer: We often get this question! First, we must note that no two patients are the same. Ig treatment will help protect you from infections such as sepsis, meningitis and other serious bacterial infections. You should not expect all infections to stop but do expect to see a reduction in the severity and the number of infections. Fatigue is a common complaint, and some patients note improvement after starting Ig treatments. In general, most patients report overall improvement after 2-3 months of initiating Ig treatment. Close follow-up with your immunologist is important because your IgG dose may need to be adjusted, depending upon your serum level of IgG, which will need to be monitored.


Question: I have IgA deficiency. Can I be an organ donor?

Answer: Many people think that their certain medical condition can disqualify them from donating their organs, but this is not true. The decision to use an organ is based on strict medical criteria. While you may have certain organs that are not be suitable for transplantation, others could be fine. The diagnosis of IgA deficiency does not disqualify one from registering to be a donor.
 

This content should not be used as a substitute for professional medical advice. In all cases, patients and caregivers should consult their healthcare providers. Each patient’s condition and treatment are unique. The benefits and risks of any treatment should be discussed with the patient’s provider.

 

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